The Blind Man’s Been Bluffed

Someone led him to his usual spot on the side of the road in Jerusalem. He made himself comfortable on this Sabbath morning and prepared to do the same thing he’d done every day for years. The same thing he expected to do every day for the next thirty years, maybe longer. It was his penance. For what, he did not know. He groped at his side for his bowl and cleared his throat. “Some alms for the blind? Can anyone spare a half-cent or a quadran?”

Sometimes people were generous, especially on holy days, when more people passed and more of them gave alms. Sometimes a wealthy man would put his hand in the bowl and rattle it but the weight of the bowl didn’t change. Strange that the poorer people never did that sort of thing. Rarely, someone would stop to talk to him; those were the best days. Continue reading

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Juxtaposition

A wealthy, powerful Roman military man in a large city (Capernaum) and a poor, helpless Jewish widow outside a small town (Nain). What could these two have in common? Luke 7

An influential synagogue leader with everything to lose and a broken woman who had already lost everything. How could they share a story? Luke 8

A ritually pure home where Pharisees gathered and the home of a wealthy but despised tax collector where prostitutes and other sinners found a seat. How could the same man be comfortable in both? Luke 5 Continue reading

A Time to Be Silent, Maybe

I’m still ruminating on this verse from last week’s post: The Lord will fight for you; you need only to be still (Exodus 14:14). And then there’s this: There is a time for everything…a time to be silent and a time to speak (Ecclesiastes 3:1a, 7b).

Consider this situation…

Luke 22:47-23:12.

The temple guards seized Jesus on the Mount of Olives and took him to the high priest’s house. After the guards mocked and beat him through the night, the religious leadership in Jerusalem interrogated Him briefly then took Him to stand before Pilate, the Roman governor of the region. Continue reading

Moses Didn’t Part the Red Sea

Moses stood on an outcropping of rock beside the Red Sea.* Below him, the Israelites paced, wrung their hands, and threw glances up at him. Pharaoh’s army was closing in behind them, and there were no boats to ferry more than a million people (Exodus 12:37-38) plus all their animals across this deep body of water. As evening approached, Moses lifted his hand out toward the sea and a strong east wind blew across the waters. Within a few hours, the water was gone, and the Israelites walked across the sea bed like it was an empty Wal-mart parking lot.

All the pictures, all the movies, and all the Bible storybooks—even the way we tell the story—would have us think Moses parted the Red Sea, but it wasn’t him. Continue reading

Stay in Your Lane!

Shortly after I turned fifteen, my Dad sat me behind the wheel of his big Ford truck, with its manual transmission and this lowest gear he called “bulldog gear.” It was almost impossible to kill the engine on that thing. Even though I’d driven a go-cart for years and the riding lawnmower for even longer (that’s another story altogether), nothing had prepared me for the frightening power of this truck. It took me a long time to learn how to control the truck rather than the truck controlling me.

One problem in driving plagued me for months, a problem unique to drivers of manual transmissions. Continue reading

Summer Review: Peter

We’re moving this week, and I just can’t settle my mind enough to write. I keep thinking of what to pack next or what needs cleaned at our new place. Plus, last week’s post about Peter is still on my mind. So I’ve gone back in the archives and cleaned up a few other posts about Peter to share with you today. I hope you find something you haven’t read previously or something the Lord wants to use in your life right now. Choose one–or all!–to read. Continue reading

Watching and Waiting

The guard stands in the tower, eyes cast downward, searching through the thick night for any change, ears tuned for any out-of-the-ordinary noise. He raises his eyes to the distant mountains, their peaks muted by the sameness of the sky. He leans against the edge of the window for a moment, but he cannot relax. He will not descend until the sun ascends.

sandstone tower
watchmen’s tower in the Middle East (c) Carole Sparks

Even in the deepest, loneliest part of the night, the guard never doubts the rising of the sun. With absolute confidence, he glances to the east for a moment, eager to catch the first graying of the dark sky, the first dimming of the stars. Continue reading