Prayer in the “Sacred Ordinary”

Prayer is an effort of the will.

-Oswald Chambers, My Utmost for His Highest

Prayers are not tools for doing or getting, but for being and becoming.

                        -Eugene Peterson, Answering God: The Psalms as Tools for Prayer

Tool: anything used as a means of accomplishing a task or purpose (dictionary.com)

The thing about a tool is, you have to pick it up and use it. It does you no good laying on the table.

I spent 2017 entirely in the Psalms, studying/reflecting on them for my daily quiet times, listening for sermons/talks about them, and reading books related to them. (Here’s a summary of what I shared.) I expected the year to be about praise, but it quickly became more about prayer than anything else. The Psalms, more than any other book in the Bible, talk to God as much or more than they talk about God. Continue reading

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Psalm 23 in the Letter S

I recently came upon a delightful challenge to biblical meditation specially tailored for us #wordnerds. The challenge is to rewrite Psalm 23 alliteratively, that is, using a single letter for as many words as possible. I’ve now alsocompleted (to the best of my ability) the letter Q, and you’ll find it at the bottom. But in the meantime, here’s my meditation using the letter S. I hope it blesses you. Find L and G at the link above.

Psalm 23 in the Letter S

The Sovereign is my shepherd,
I am sufficiently supplied. Continue reading

A Year in the Psalms

I’m still looking back at 2017, in which the Lord called me to spend my daily quiet time in Psalms. For the whole year. I read through the entire book twice, covering one psalm each day except for Psalm 119, where I covered one section a day. That left me about two weeks at the end of the year to dwell in the Christmas story. Continue reading

Obedience is Not My Goal

The Pharisees of Jesus’ time had a particular way of doing almost everything. They had taken the Old Testament laws and dissected them, working out the best methods and restrictions to ensure they obeyed those laws. Their work led to piles and piles of instructions, details, stipulations, and exceptions. They even had a formula for getting dressed in the morning. If, in your morning ministrations, you skipped one of the prayers or started with the wrong foot, you had to go back and start over. There’s a mindfulness to such deliberateness, but it would have been exhausting—always worrying about prescriptive rules and working to remember every. single. thing. Continue reading

Stay in Your Lane!

Shortly after I turned fifteen, my Dad sat me behind the wheel of his big Ford truck, with its manual transmission and this lowest gear he called “bulldog gear.” It was almost impossible to kill the engine on that thing. Even though I’d driven a go-cart for years and the riding lawnmower for even longer (that’s another story altogether), nothing had prepared me for the frightening power of this truck. It took me a long time to learn how to control the truck rather than the truck controlling me.

One problem in driving plagued me for months, a problem unique to drivers of manual transmissions. Continue reading